Salty Salutations: Music Makes For A Great Night Out In Seminyak

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Salty Seagull’s AKA Salty’s Bib, Rib and Crab Shack, Seminyak.

Seminyak is not the real Bali, I’m told by so many people. Usually in a most dismissive tone. That’s a “duh” moment, if I’ve ever heard one.

OK, so the rice paddies and vegetable fields, verdant terraces and rainforest are long gone, replaced by traffic, boutiques, bars and restaurants. So, too, are the paddy rats, pythons and cobras, which is just fine by me.

If I wanted wildlife of the sort that makes my skin crawl, or ulcerate or worse, I’d be calling Canggu or Umalas home. But I want to live in Seminyak and, at the moment, I am.

Since my arrival, I’ve moved around southern Bali to better assess where I wish to hang my many hats. I started in Legian although, in actuality, it was Kuta; to state the bleeding obvious, as I’m not 19, steroid-crazed and heavily tattooed, it’s not the area for me.

BBQ Pork Ribs at Salty's
BBQ Pork Ribs at Salty’s

I then moved north to Seminyak and spent a few weeks at various points of the ‘Yak compass. Following a stretch in Sanur which was awfully nice if a little too sleepy for my tastes, I had the opportunity to return to Seminyak and this is where I feel I belong.

This I pretty much knew way ahead of time, well before I left Australia, but I needed to experience it afresh and in depth before committing.

In Sydney, I was an inner city boy. It was the proximity to all the social amenities, from caffeine to gym, artisanal bread-makers to live music venues, that gave me at least a passing illusion of being connected. Living in Seminyak is pretty much the same except it’s far cheaper and considerably warmer. Living deep in the gangs or alleyways of Seminyak, I get the best of two very different worlds – as the sun sets and thoughts drift to dinner, I can decide on just about any cuisine and it’s usually within walking distance.

But no matter how fierce the traffic and nightlife becomes, my villa is whisper quiet, a canopy of stars twinkle overhead, I can sit under a frangipani tree or lounge in the shallow end of the swimming pool, and I count the very many ways my good fortune has played out.

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If, however, I do want a little more stimulus, there are any number of fine bars, many with great live music.

One of my favourites is variously known as Salty Seagull’s (as it appears on its Facebook site) or Salty’s Bib, Rib and Crab Shack (as per its own menu) in Jl Petitenget, just south of Potato Head and the W Hotel. Regardless of the name, I discovered it early on, when it was still quite new. The theme is Caribbean beach shack and, as the name suggests, it specialises in mud crabs (of the chilli, salt and pepper, and plain boiled kind) and ribs (pork in either BBQ or chilli and soy), along with a small selection of other items including hamburgers and fish and chips.

There’s seating in a variety of semi-indoor bar areas or outdoors at retro picnic tables, a number of specialty nights such as half-price ribs on Monday, half price crabs on Wednesdays and a local rockabilly band on Thursdays, the staff are friendly and quite proactive on the service front, but – for me, at least – the real attraction is the music.

Salty’s is owned by Australian restaurateur, Adrian Reed, who already scored such a hit with his nearby Motel Mexicola. Adrian is obviously a man of impeccable and highly-evolved musical tastes; Mexicola is worthy of its own mention in this blog (as it will eventually be) but the music there is as stand-out as its soft tacos with an emphasis on quirky vintage Mexican pop.

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At Salty’s, there’s an undercurrent of reggae, to shore up its Caribbean credentials, along with some wondrously obscure cuts, some of which even left me baffled. Early on, when I was there a couple of times a week, I’d while the night away with a most satisfying game of “name that tune”.

To give some small example of what to expect, here’s what I caught at just one session: Led Zeppelin, the Wayne Fontana version of Love Potion #9, Bob Seger’s Beautiful Loser, Ian Dury, a version of Free Bird I’m not familiar with, Talking Heads’ Sugar On My Tongue, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s Got To Get Ourselves Back To The Garden, The Proclaimers, The Rolling Stones’ Carol, The Hollies’ Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress, early Dionne Warwick, Elvis Costello’s The Angels Want To Wear My Red Shoes, The Five Man Electrical Band, Wilson Pickett’s Something You Got, and Peter Tosh’s Johnny B. Goode.

Now that I’m back in Seminyak, I’m eager to see if the music still holds up. Join me one night and find out.

Salty Seagull’s (AKA Salty’s Bib, Rib and Crab Shack).
Jl Petitenget 999, Seminyak
Tel: (0361) 8497 588

 

© words and photos David Latta 2014

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Author: davidlatta

David Latta is an award-winning editor, journalist and photographer. His work has appeared in scores of Australian and international newspapers and magazines including The Sydney Morning Herald, The Australian, The Australian Financial Review, The Courier-Mail and Travel & Leisure. During the last two decades, he has largely concentrated on travel and tourism, editing more than a dozen B2B titles and major conference and incentive travel publications. He is the author of critically-acclaimed books on such subjects as architecture and design, Australian history, literary criticism and music. These titles include Lost Glories: A Memorial To Forgotten Australian Buildings, Sand On The Gumshoe: A Century Of Australian Crime Writing, and Australian Country Music. He is currently working on a book about the nightclub scene in 1970s Sydney as well as a sprawling thriller set in Sydney during World War II. As an arts commentator, humourist and trend-spotter, his opinions are sought across the gamat of traditional and social media.

7 thoughts on “Salty Salutations: Music Makes For A Great Night Out In Seminyak”

    1. I’m afraid I can’t help you there. I’m not a big crab fan. The ribs are good, though. And the friends I’ve taken there who have had the crabs seemed to enjoy them. As a matter of fact, I’m just about to head up there now. I’ll have a Bintang for you!

      1. Are the ribs as good as Naughty Nuri’s ? I love my crab especially mud crab. Will be there in September so will definitely put in on my list

      1. Dan – do I have news for you! I’ve been spending a lot of time checking out the ribs at various places and have come up with the best so far. And at a restaurant that’s way off the radar. I tried Nuri’s in Ubud and wasn’t that fussed. But a few days ago, a friend took me to Made Becik Warung, a small eatery at Jl Tirta Tawer No. 6, about ten minutes’ drive from the centre of Ubud. It’s near the Botanic Gardens. The grilled pork ribs are Rp50,000 a serve and are the most tender I’ve tried in Bali (including at Salty’s which, I’m sorry to report, has been a bit patchy of late). I’d also recommended the grilled duck, again really really tender and the same price. Made Becik is so good I ate there twice in two days. Tel: (0361) 9000 576.

      2. David, have just got back from a quick six day trip to Seminyak – I’ve yet to put the details up on my blog. Needless to say we made sure that we sampled a new restaurant every night we were there. The last night before we left we went to Salty Seagulls, as it was a Monday night 1/2 price ribs! Unfortunately because our flight was later that night we went early so the bar was just getting exciting when we left. Had a great meal although from memory though the ribs @ Naughty Nuri’s (we only went to the one in Keraboken not Ubud) were better, more tender & better marinated. We loved the whole set up at Saltys – even met the Aussie owners – wished we could have spent longer there maybe next time & maybe for the crab races. I’ll make a note of the Warung in Ubud for next time we spend some time upcountry. Keep letting me know if you find any more great places to eat in Bali. Dan

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