Sun, Sand And Seriously Good Times: The Komune Beach Club Blitzes The Competition

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Beach clubs. Unless you’re a twenty-something with a serious gym addiction, you’ll have a love-hate relationship with beach clubs. In my previous life, my opinion would be “never”. Maybe with “ever, ever” added for emphasis. But since coming to Bali, I’ve been trying a lot of new stuff, some of which has severely confused long-time friends and associates.

Into this category I would put visiting Ubud, ground zero for all things weird and wonderful, and spending any amount of time in vegetarian cafes, especially if it involved eating and/or drinking. Yet I’ve done both several times recently; Ubud I still rank as weird but also most definitely wonderful along with fascinating and endlessly compelling. That it has some great museums and restaurants certainly helps.

As for the vegetarian side of things, I’ve had some truly tasty vegetarian meals and even been gradually getting my palate (and nether regions) accustomed to juicing. Not that vegetables will ever supplant bacon as my favourite food group but, after a couple of heart attacks, I suppose I should exercise some caution.

This has engendered much consternation and concern amongst my friends; when I’ve made such announcements on Facebook, several immediately assumed my account had been hacked.

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Never say never. Approach each new experience with an open mind. And trust people will have your interests at heart when they share their own loves and interests with you. Am I getting a little too New Age?

Then I won’t mention the recent shopping expedition to get a yoga mat. Wait, don’t call psychiatric services just yet. I’m not planning on yoga. Some things really are never, ever, ever (note to self: check back in a few months’ time to see if this still holds). I merely needed some cushioning for the hard tile floors of my room while I do general toning work (push-ups, planks, etc) between gym visits.

There was a close call during the shopping expedition when the only likely candidate I could find was a Hello Kitty yoga mat. I did consider it, however briefly, but irony can be an exhausting concept to justify, especially in a foreign country. What might have flown in the inner city of Sydney was definitely not going to soar too high in Indonesia.

Creep old guy on a yoga mat? Maybe. Creepy old guy on a Hello Kitty yoga mat? I could already hear the sirens in the distance.

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Luckily I persevered and found another mat, much thicker, much better quality, in a fetching battleship grey. Crisis averted.

Anyway, back to beach clubs. There are a few in the Seminyak area, notably Ku De Ta and Potato Head. The former I’ve visited enough times to know I’m just not cut out to socialise with the young, buff and beautiful. At Potato Head, I initially couldn’t even get beyond the style enforcer on the door. And that was when I was wearing clothes. Undressed, I just wouldn’t want to be responsible for the mass panic, the collective fear and loathing that would surely manifest.

Then a friend suggested visiting the Komune Beach Club at Keramas Beach on the East Coast, not far short of Candidasa. In the spirit of opening myself up to new experiences, I reached for my spiritual Magic 8-Ball (which, admittedly, is generally stuck on hell, yeah) and it immediately came up with hell, yeah (what did I tell you?)

It was just a matter of getting there. I’d been quoted Rp400,000 (around $AU37.00) each way for a car and driver from Seminyak to Keramas. But I also knew this could be a worthy introduction to exploring the more distant parts of Bali, so I determined that, without any previous experience, I would hire a motor scooter and ride there myself.

And that, my friends, will be the subject of another post.

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So long story short, I booked a room at Komune, charted my journey via Google Maps (a total of 35 kilometres, I was informed, about 40 minutes) and set off. The route was pretty much idiot-proof as I took the Sunset Road then the Ngurah Rai by-pass towards Sanur.  It was just a matter of following my nose until I was roughly east of Denpasar. This road was a direct route to Ubud but, taking notice of the unusually assistive signage, I branched off onto (deep breathe) Jl Professor Doktor Ida Bagus Mantra towards Candidasa.

In all, and taking into account over-shooting the Keramas Beach turn-off, I arrived in the parking lot of Komune about 90 minutes later. So much for Google Maps (and that will definitely be another post).

It’s billed as a four-star resort with 66 guestrooms and suites. The rack rate for rooms is $AU150 but on-line booking sites go as far down as $AU75. For suites, rack is $AU192, with discounts as low as $AU113. A number of package deals are also available. Eat, Play, Surf includes room, daily breakfast, five massages, two night surfing lessons or two yoga sessions, two sunset cocktails and one dinner. Packages are for a minimum of five or seven nights.

The guestrooms are air-conditioned with comfortable beds and large bathrooms. There is a well-stocked mini-bar, enough power points, loads of natural light, and the only drawback I could really note was an unusual design flaw that allowed neighbours to be heard quite distinctly, even if they weren’t particularly noisy. And it stands to reason that if you can hear them, they can most certainly hear you. You’ve been warned.

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The beach club aspect is a real winner. Walk through reception and the vast tropical gardens and you’re a grassy field overlooking Keramas Beach. A large swimming pool, bracketed with wide plush day beds, looks out on the surfers attempting to dodge the rocks and master the breaks.

At one end is an elevated two-level beach shack with a shabby-chic-meets-Ralph-Lauren vibe. Spotlights directed at the beach are used for night surfing. At the other end is an ultra-modern dining area nestled under the sloping angle of what appears to be a tropical interpretation of a 1950s Hollywood flying saucer (very The Day The Earth Stood Still, the Michael Rennie version not the atrocious Keanu Reeves remake). Just beyond that is an outdoor cinema; if there are no thrill-seekers ingracious enough not to provide night surfing entertainment, at least there’s a fall-back.

After the pricing of Seminyak’s Potato Head or Cocoon, which is much more in line with an upmarket Sydney bar, food and beverage at Komune is a delight. The Big Barrel Burger, with egg, cheese, bacon and beetroot, costs Rp80,000 ($AU7.37), the same price as the Chorizo and Calamari Salad and the Komune Roast Vegetable Salad.

Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served in the flying saucer, while lunch and snacks are always available around the pool area. Weekdays are the time to visit; on the weekends, especially Sundays, families take control of the pool.

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Komune is especially proud of their green credentials. Their solar farm provides much of the electricity, the organic garden many of the vegetables, they have a dedicated team for cleaning the beach and adjoining river, they treat their own waste water and use it to water plants and garden, and they also make their own bottled water.

Located far enough away from the tourist hordes to deter those who would frequent Potato Head and Ku De Ta, Komune is a very special experience. Did it reshape my view of beach clubs? It did. Will I return? Most definitely; I’ll be there again in a few days. Despite the distance, it’s still close enough to home (and Ubud, should I feel like a side serving of weird with my burger) to merit a day trip.

It’s in a beautiful part of the world, with Nusa Lembongan and Nusa Penida in one direction and the looming presence of the semi-retired volcano, Mount Agung, in the other, a dark sand beach and cold eager surf that carries a taste of salt to the day beds. Basking in the sun, cocktail at hand, music prickling your consciousness, there seems no better way to celebrate yet another perfect day in Bali. And, with the right company, there probably isn’t.

© words and photos David Latta 2014

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Author: davidlatta

David Latta is an award-winning editor, journalist and photographer. His work has appeared in scores of Australian and international newspapers and magazines including The Sydney Morning Herald, The Australian, The Australian Financial Review, The Courier-Mail and Travel & Leisure. During the last two decades, he has largely concentrated on travel and tourism, editing more than a dozen B2B titles and major conference and incentive travel publications. He is the author of critically-acclaimed books on such subjects as architecture and design, Australian history, literary criticism and music. These titles include Lost Glories: A Memorial To Forgotten Australian Buildings, Sand On The Gumshoe: A Century Of Australian Crime Writing, and Australian Country Music. He is currently working on a book about the nightclub scene in 1970s Sydney as well as a sprawling thriller set in Sydney during World War II. As an arts commentator, humourist and trend-spotter, his opinions are sought across the gamat of traditional and social media.

3 thoughts on “Sun, Sand And Seriously Good Times: The Komune Beach Club Blitzes The Competition”

  1. I live just 5 mins from Komune, but I’ve never been there.
    As someone at early 20, people just talk about Ku De Ta or Potato Head (which to me are overrated). I really appreciate your honest review and I also read about Salty Seagull and I must say I couldn’t agree more

    1. Thanks, Maria. I’ve been quite a regular at Komune since my first visit. I really recommend you try it out although Sundays may be best avoided. And I share your reluctance for Ku De Ta and Potato Head but there are enough suckers out there willing to pay ridiculous prices and suffer numerous indignities for bragging rights. Komune is just far enough away from the tourist hotspots to deter the wankers. As for Salty’s, I’m not sure I’d be as generous if I was reviewing it lately. They’ve had a difficult time finding their identity.

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